Electronics in a spin?

Electronics in a spin?

Branch talk

Electronics in a spin?

Professor Sarah Thompson, Department of Physics, University of York

101 years after JJ Thomson was awarded the Nobel Prize for the discovery of the electron, the 2007 Nobel Prize for Physics was awarded to Professors Peter Grünberg and Albert Fert for the discovery of Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) in which the spin as well as the charge of the electron is manipulated and exploited in nanoscale magnetic materials. Modern technology also has a significant role to play in the award of this Nobel Prize: GMR is only manifest in nanoscale materials, and the development of nanotechnology growth techniques was a necessary pre-requisite; further, the considerable demands of the magnetic data storage industry to drive up the data density stored on a hard disk fuelled an enormous international research effort following the initial discovery with the result that more that 5 billion GMR read-heads have since been manufactured. This technology drive continues to inspire exploration of the spin current in the field now known as spintronics, generating new ideas and applications. The talk explores the science underpinning GMR and spintronics, the different routes to its discovery taken by Professors Grünberg and Fert, the new science, materials and applications that the discovery has triggered and the considerable potential for the future.

Organised By
IOP Manchester and District Branch
Date/Time
24 Apr 2019 17:45 to 19:30
Location
Lecture theatre 1, Brooks Building
53 Bonsall Street
Manchester
M15 6GX
Invite Friends