A woman and two men at lunchtime

Sixteenth Edinburgh Lunchtime Rendezvous

This Lunchtime Rendezvous is primarily a social occasion for the Seniors Group but the talks are intended to be of interest to all.   Over coffee and lunch there will be an opportunity to discuss possible future events of interest to Members.

Programme:

1000    Arrival and coffee/tea [first floor]

1025    Welcome by the Seniors’ Group Chair [ground floor]

1027    Introduction by Edinburgh Meeting Organiser

1030    Lecture Nuclear Fusion: Energy Source of the Future? by Professor Robert Alan Cairns, Emeritus Professor of Applied Mathematics, University of St Andrews, Visiting Professor of Physics, University of Strathclyde. [ground floor].

1125    Five Minute Break

1130    Lecture What do Edinburgh’s Monuments tell us about the City by Dr John  Nicholas Amoore, formerly Head of Department, Department of Medical Physics, NHS Ayrshire and Arran. [ground floor].

1225    Four Course Lunch with Wine (Waitress Service) with partners and friends [first floor].

1500    Finish

Abstracts

Nuclear Fusion: Energy Source of the Future? by Professor Robert Alan Cairns, BSc, PhD, C Phys, FIinstP, FRSE, Emeritus Professor of Applied Mathematics, University of St Andrews, Visiting Professor of Physics, University of Strathclyde.

Nuclear fusion, the process that powers the stars, has the potential to provide a virtually unlimited source of energy here on Earth, but producing this energy in a controlled way has, so far, proved to be an elusive goal.  In this talk I will outline the basic process involved, the difficulties involved in harnessing it and the devices that have been developed to overcome these difficulties. Despite the oft repeated jibe along the lines that fusion power is thirty years in the future and has been for the last fifty years, I will show that real progress has been made and that there is a good chance that ITER, a device currently under construction in the south of France, will succeed in generating fusion power.  I will conclude with some thoughts on the question raised in my title.  Will fusion be the energy source of the future? 

What do Edinburgh’s Monuments tell us about the City by Dr John Nicholas Amoore,

 BSc, MSc, PhD, formerly Head of Department, Department of Medical Physics, NHS Ayrshire and Arran.

The talk begins with a quick overview of Edinburgh’s public monuments erected to remember people or events. Selected monuments are discussed in more detail, chosen because of their personal appeal or introduction to the talk’s theme – what do the monuments tell us about Edinburgh. There are monuments to monarchs, leaders and to military men and events. But two themes dominate, firstly literature, illustrated along Princes Street by the towering Scott monument, but also, not as obviously, in monuments to Adam Black, John Wilson and Allan Ramsay and in Edinburgh Park to herms of Twelve Poets. Secondly, the striving for freedom, for a better life, corporately and individually. The Enlightenment expanded people’s thinking, with statues of Adam Smith and David Hume. The Martyrs monument honours the ‘Friends of the People’ who campaigned for universal suffrage. Monuments to Thomas Guthrie and Helen Crummy honour their endeavours to better individual lives. Several monuments recall the fight for independence and the Scottish Parliament.  Consideration will be given to whom monuments ignore, who should have a monument, and how to choose. It ends with a recognition that monuments are but one way of remembering. Mary Erskine, 17th century business women and philanthropist is remembered by her school. Horace boldly proclaimed that in his writing he had created “a monument more lasting than bronze”.

Menu

Caesar salad with avocado and rocket salad topped with fresh parmesan shavings.

Seared breast of Duck in a spiced orange sauce, timbales of basmati rice with stir-fried greens.

A selection of Cheese with Oatcakes

Warm chocolate Fondant served with vanilla ice cream

coffee and petits fours

Fruit Juice and Strathmore Sparkling Mineral Water

In addition, the following wines are also included:

White Wine :

Bouchard Ainé & Fils, Pouilly-Fuissé, France, 2017

Red Wine :

 Château Lamothe-Cissac, Cuvée Vieilles Vignes, Haut Médoc, France, 2014 

 

BOOKING FORM

Please complete Section A, B or C, as appropriate, as well as Section D.

SECTION A

I wish to have coffee/tea and attend the lectures only at a cost of £0.00

I will/will not be accompanied by my Partner (Cost £0.00), making a total of …....person(s).

………………………………………………………………………………………………

SECTION B

I am a Member and wish to attend the whole event at a cost of £37.00

I will/will not be accompanied by my Partner (Cost £37.00), making a total of …....person(s).

………………………………………………………………………………………………

SECTION C

I am not a Member and wish to attend the whole event at a cost of £47.00.

I will/will not be accompanied by my Partner (Cost £47.00), making a total of …….person(s).

………………………………………………………………………………………………

SECTION D                          Name: ……………………………………………….

                                                Address: …………………………………………….

                                                              ……………………………………………..

                                                E-mail: -----------------------------------------------------

Name of Partner (if coming) ……………………………………

I enclose a cheque for £………….

Special dietary requirements…………………………………………………………….

The completed form, together with payment, should be forwarded to

Mrs Gail Millar, 4 Wellview Lane, Muirieston, Livingston, West Lothian, EH54 9HU, to arrive by Thursday the 14th of March 2019.   Cheques should be made payable to the Institute of Physics. Please note the new address for the Seniors’ Group Chair.

Date/Time
27 Mar 2019 10:00 to 15:00
Location
Clubhouse, Daniel Stewart’s and Melville College
523 Ferry Road
Edinburgh
UK
EH5 2DW
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